Many health care jobs don’t require certification or a degree. With no prior experience, you can hit the ground running and get trained on the job. Here are some fields in which you can get started in after a some educational training.

Medical Assistant
Medical assistants take care of office duties such as greeting patients, scheduling appointments, handling phone calls, pulling and updating medical records, and communicating with hospitals and laboratories. Depending on the office, some medical assistants also perform such functions as taking blood pressure and helping doctors during appointments. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median yearly pay for this job in 2012 was $29,370.

Personal Care Aide
Personal care aides work in patients’ homes or in facilities to help them with daily living activities. Their duties include assisting with laundry, meal preparation, making beds, bathing and keeping an open dialogue with families and patients on various issues including nutrition. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median yearly pay for this job in 2012 was $19,910.

Orderly
Orderlies help nurses with generalized care tasks such as accompanying patients to and from examination rooms or operating rooms, setting up and organizing medical supplies and equipment, and monitoring patients. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median yearly pay for this job in 2012 was $23,990.

Medical Transcriptionist
Medical transcriptionists take oral recordings from doctors and other professionals and adapt them into reports using speech-recognition technology. They edit such documents as necessary and must be familiar with medical jargon and abbreviations. Common reports they work with include patient histories and discharge summaries. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median yearly pay for this job in 2012 was $ $34,020. Certification certainly is not required but may lead to better job prospects and higher pay.

Medical Records and Health Information Technicians
Medical billers basically keep the billings and payment process running smoothly. They get payments from patients, work with insurance companies for reimbursement and update and maintain billing records. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median yearly pay for this job in 2012 was $34,160. While certification is sometimes not required, it may lead to better job prospects and higher pay.